After our trip to London last week, we thought to counter balance this with a nice gentle walk in the Lake District. Yesterday, we were seeing Sarah and Graham Chaplin-Brice, at Low Bridge End Farm in St. John’s in the Vale to discuss the new website we’re building them (incidentally they were unfortunately affected in the December floods, with the bridge that gives access to their house and farm damaged beyond repair by the flood). On the way up the recently opened A591 (hurrah!!!) at Dunmail Raise we started chatting about Helvellyn, mainly around walking it one evening whilst the nights are still so light.

So that evening back we headed, with appropriate walking gear (of course), with a multitude of snacks and plenty of water (not forgetting plasters). We parked up at the top of Dunmail Raise and started the challenging walk up alongside Raise Beck, with several new rock formations – thanks December flood! up to Grisedale Tarn. The going was strenuous, or lets face it tough going, we are after all mainly a flat land walking couple. From here we made our way up to Dollywagon Pike, then onto Nethermost Pike and last but certainly not least Helvellyn where low and behold the clouds broke for spectacular panoramic views – as you can see from our selection of photographs.

Why this tale of a walk you may ask, after all it isn’t a walking journal after all. No, it isn’t but we do like to give you an insight into our life and how we fit Freshspace, our business into it. An evening walk like this serves to remind us that there’s more to life than work. We could have easily failed to notice the stunning views on our way to see a client, but that’s not who we are. Standing on top of Helvellyn looking down at Red Tarn and over towards Striding Edge and beyond it’s good to take stock and realise how special a place the Lake District is and how lucky we are to work in such a beautiful place.

On a final note you’ll be pleased to here that no plasters were needed but on getting home just shy of 11pm, 2 cold and very welcome beers were drunk.

Article by Eilidh Nicholls